Monty Heald Fund Update – Summer 2016

Below you will find comments from players on our National Senior Women’s 15, who, for the first time in recent memory, did not have to pay to play for Canada at the recent Super Series. They were subsidized by the Monty Heald National Women’s Fund via the Canadian Rugby Foundation. This fund was established to ensure players would not have to play in lead up to and at the 2017 Women’ Rugby World cup. In conjunction with Rugby Canada and National Women’s team management, budgets were reviewed and targets for the fund were set. The goal is to leave a legacy fund that will go beyond the World Cup. We have a remarkable donor who contributed an initial $50,000 to start the fund. In addition, this same donor offered to match $175,000 if we could organize the community to donate a similar amount. We have raised $102,000 to date and need to raise another $73,000 to meet our target.

Please help us in supporting the talented and dedicated young women whose ambitions are only to bring home the Women’s Rugby World Cup in 2017. Your contributions will mean they can focus on their skills and preparation. Donations are tax deductible and will be matched!

Thank you for your support
Stephanie White
Chairwomen, Monty Heald National Women’s Fund
http://www.canadianrugbyfoundation.ca/content/index.php/monty-heald-national-womens-fund/

 


 

 

 

Brantford Harlequins RFC Charitable Fund

Overview

The Brantford Harlequins RFC Charitable Fund is comprised of 2 components, the Endowment Fund and the Capital Projects Accumulation Fund. 50% of each and every donation will be allocated to these two components.

Brantford Harlequins RFC will appoint 2 named “Foundation Representatives”.  These representatives will hold the position of Foundation Representative for a maximum four years in total in any consecutive six year period.  The positions will be renewed bi-annually at the AGM of Brantford Harlequins RFC.  The Foundation Representatives will be responsible for liaising with the Canadian Rugby Foundation and encouraging donations to the fund from all avenues available as well as distributing funds to the club.

The Endowment Fund

The Endowment Fund will accumulate permanent capital.   This capital will generate interest that will be paid to the club each year for the expenses outlined below.  The Brantford Harlequins RFC Foundation Representatives require that all payments be approved prior to the expense being incurred by the recipient.   All approvals will be at the discretion of the Foundation Representatives and an Endowment Fund “Request For Funds” application must be completed by the recipient.

Annual guidelines for amounts and eligibility for receiving these funds will be published each January/February when it is known how much is available to be paid from The Endowment Fund.  The Foundation Representatives will be responsible for formulating and publishing these guidelines each year.

1)      Brantford Harlequins coach development and/or compensation

2)      Brantford Harlequins member/player/coach support for Elite programs outside of the Brantford Harlequins RFC club program

3)      Brantford Harlequins members who are referees are eligible for educational and development support as well as expenses related to refereeing at out of province Elite level events

The Capital Projects Accumulation Fund (CPAF)

The CPAF will accumulate capital that can be drawn upon to fund Brantford Harlequins RFC Executive Committee and the Strategic Planning Committee (Futures Committee) approved capital projects for the improvement of and expansion to the Brantford Harlequins RFC facilities.  This includes but is not limited to the acquisition of real property.   In order to be eligible for funds from the CPAF a project must have a cost of more than $20,000.00.   This fund is not to be accessed for repairs and maintenance.

MAKE A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION NOW USING THE FORM BELOW

Monty Heald – a great Rugby Man and an important participant in Canadian Rugby.

Monty emigrated from England in 1968 and became active in local rugby from the outset. Having played for the Hamilton Hornets for four years, he became a Founding Member of the Burlington Centaurs Rugby Club in 1973.  He served this club well, becoming its first Captain, President of the Club, and eventually a Life Member. His early contributions to the game continued in Ontario as he went serve as a Director of the Senior Team for the Niagara Rugby Union and a selector for the Ontario Rugby Union for two years (1979/80).  They were to be an indication of the scope on his impact across all aspects of the game in Canada.

In 1981, Monty became a National Selector and chaired the Canadian Rugby Union Selection Committee for the period 1983 to 1994. In 1984 and 1985 he was appointed as the Manager of the Canadian Sevens team which played in the Hong Kong Sevens. In 1984, he was appointed as the Manager of the Canadian team and he served in this position for Can-Am matches in Chicago (1984), Tucson (1986) and Seattle (1990). His managerial career was highlighted by the seven match tour to Australia, in 1985, during which the Test matches in Sydney and Brisbane represented the first ever meetings between Canada and Australia.  Monty was also the manager of the first Canadian team which participated in the CANZ (Canada, Argentina/New Zealand) series (1989) taking the National team to Argentina and New Zealand.

Monty was elected to the Board of Directors of the Canadian Rugby Union in 1986, serving as Director of the Men’s National Team for the period 1986 – 1991. In 1991, he was elected as President and he served in this capacity for eight years.  He led Rugby Canada through the game’s period of remarkable change at the end of the twentieth century seeing the number of international fixtures involving Canada’s Senior Men’s team increase by 160% and a tremendous increase in the number of domestic players, including the explosive growth of the women’s game.  In 1995 the Pan America Rugby Association (PARA) was formed and Monty served as Rugby Canada’s first representative including two years as PARA’s President.  He served the national organization for twenty years, finishing his service, in 2000, as a Director.

Monty never lost sight of the game on the ground and was often available to help behind the scenes and support of his colleagues, which included all members of the rugby community in Canada.  With his business partner, Lexie Tynan, their company, Monilex Sports, supported rugby teams of at all levels.  A lasting legacy is evident in the establishment of the Monilex Cup, the Canadian Interuniversity Sport’s National championship for Women’s rugby.  Beyond working with the universities during the lead up to the inaugural event, Monilex also helped finance the very first Championship game in 1999, which featured McMaster and Guelph. The event is now held annually and represents a primary elite competition for women in Canada aspiring to the national team.

Monty came to the rescue to provide equipment on more than one occasion, when the Women’s National XV Team needed help.  In 2005, when Canada was hosting the Canada Cup in Ottawa, a tournament for Women’s National teams, one of the teams dropped out at the last minute.  To fill the schedule, Rugby Canada decided to field two teams.  Monty stepped up to supply the required additional set of National jerseys for this second team, giving those players a new kit to play in the event.  Even with the short notice, Monty came through with flying colors.  Three years prior, in circumstance of greater pressure, he received a call from the manager of Canada’s 2002 Women’s Rugby World Cup…from the team bus in Barcelona as the team prepared for the event.  It had been discovered that all kit had to be clean, only country and World Cup cresting was allowed. Canada’s jersey had a sponsors crest on the jersey. Without hesitation, Monty made arrangements for a refreshed set of strip and for its delivery to Spain by loyal supporters from Canada.

An account of Monty Heald would not be complete without a reflection of his joie de vivre.  Roxanne Butler, Manager of the Women’s National Team, related a story of Monty being at the Women’s World Cup in Holland when he was the Rugby Canada President. “There was a Banquet. We were accommodated in a big tent type room and seated at tons of picnic tables. The night got very boisterous and many teams started dancing on the tops of the tables…. Well, so did our leader. Worried me a little at the time but there were no injuries and it showed his enjoyable character.”

The organizers of the Monty Heald National Women’s Fund have taken this opportunity to recognize and honour Monty for his many, many contributions to Rugby in our country.  Monty was exemplary in his dedication to the game at all levels.  He was active in the Rugby community until 2014, coaching at the Waterdown High School, serving as Chair of Rugby Canada’s Past Presidents committee, Chair of the Hall of Fame Committee and member of the Annual Awards Committee of Rugby Canada.  Monty was inducted into the Ontario Rugby Union Hall of Fame in 2004 and in 2013 Rugby Canada inducted him as its second Honorary Life Member.  He was a tremendous ambassador for our sport, representing the Canadian rugby community at local, provincial, national and international levels.  We are honoured to still be working with him in promoting and supporting the game

Thunder Indigenous Rugby Program

A fund specifically for the Thunder Indigenous Rugby Program has been setup, the donation form is attached below.

Program Desciption

ThunderThe Thunder continue to soar, promoting the great game of 7’s rugby to Indigenous communities in Canada.  The Thunder focus on Sevens Rugby, an exciting version of rugby, and is now recognized as an Olympic Sport.

Goals: The Thunder aims to offer a structured vehicle to promote the game of rugby to Indigenous communities and to identify potential high performance Indigenous athletes that could one day represent Canada.

 Targets

  • Develop a full-time Thunder Rugby Development officer position
  • Continue to offer Summer Rugby Camps for Indigenous Youth
  • Showcase Indigenous athletes at 7s tournaments
  • Grow programs for U18, U16 and U14 Indigenous youth
  • Introduce rugby to Indigenous communities
  • Expand coaching staff and facilitate coach development.

Website www.thunderrugby.ca
Facebook at www.facebook.com/ThunderIndigenousRugby/
Twitter at twitter.com/ThunderRugbyCA

Gallery

Thunder Galler 1
Thunder Gallery 2
SELECT THUNDER RUGBY IN THE FUND LIST BELOW

How Castaway Wanderers Grew Their Fund to $100K in 8 Years Using $20

How do you make a difference with $20?

The not for profit world is full of organizations in crisis – or finding just enough resources to operate for the rest of the year. And the cycle of raising funds to remain solvent starts again in the next calendar year.

So it is with many rugby clubs, mine, Castaway Wanderers Rugby Football Club was/is no exception. A rough season with income generation and we are in a very tough place. One opportunity to become more fiscally prudent, was sparked for our club through the generosity of a major supporter of the Canadian Rugby Foundation. CWRFC learned that for every new  dollar raised for Canadian rugby and invested with the Canadian Rugby Foundation, this donor would match that with a 25% gift. Great incentive.

In the Spring of 2007, CWRFC launched an initiative that sought a monthly commitment of $20 from members of the club family. This would be permanently vested with the CRF, matched with the 25% mentioned earlier and thus become $300 annually per contributor into this new pooled fund. Tough to do much with the interest on $300 BUT we imagined a growing participation in this initiative and the impact this would have on the fund growth.

Fast forward eight years to Summer, 2015 and this fund that began with 2 investors at $20/month each has just reached $100,000 of vested capital. This is one more step on the path to greater stability and opportunity for our club.

Chris Spicer. Past President. CWRFC. Victoria. BC

About CWRFC

CWRFC has a long, storied history in British Columbia Canada. Their journey dates back over 100 years. The club is the amalgamation of the Oak Bay Wanderers (founded 1912) and the Castaway (founded 1965) Rugby organizations in 1989. The Club proudly displays BC Championship banners from 1999 to 2002, three consecutive seasons of interlock play involving Vancouver Island and Mainland clubs- a feat accomplished by only one other BC Club – and another BC Championship in 2011. Whether it is via Club tours of visiting teams of all ages, the National Senior Men’s Team members, players from coast to coast and internationally, or CW players currently on professional contracts, the Castaway Wanderers name and brand is known across Canada and around the world.